About your Search

20121223
20121223
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
of energy and life and hope for the world. you have decorated it with peace cranes and light. wishes and dreams, and most importantly your energy. and now, on behalf of the sisters of perpetual indulgence inc, we gather this energy and strength that we may send it to the nuns above and to give it to any and all that needs its strength. to release the energy of hope that this magnificent tree represents i will ask each and every one of you if you please every time you hear me say we say... you will evoke the words of harvey milk by saying as one group you got to give them hope. now please raise your hands towards the tree of hope and we say you got to give them hope. for all lgbtq young people struggling with bullies and intolerance, we say that you got to give them hope for all transgendered people fighting to live with dignity and respect. we say you got to give them hope. for all of those who seek to protect the rights of lgbtq people across the world, we say you got to give them hope. for our sick and elderly in need of a will having word, a sign of hope, we say, you got to give t
in the year 2011 and we just began implementing our existing commercial energy performance ordinance which helps private property owners lower energy use. through san francisco's program green sf we are making it easier for property owners to secure financing for green building upgrades and as can you see green buildings has become the standard rather than the exception. for our public libraries to affordable housing units, even to the home of our world series giants and their structure our buildings are achieving lead certification at a rapid pace and our san francisco public utilities commission has won smartest building in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important things we are doing for the whole country. [applause] and we are creating and sustaining jobs as well as supporting new industries in our city. our energy watch program creates or su
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
happen you can get it done and i just want to thank you guys for all your energy and excitement you bring to san francisco and for the giants day in and day out. you all are the best. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> well, -- audience: romo, romo. >> well, first off congratulations san francisco. we definitely couldn't have done it without you guys. i will venture to say -- there is one thing i noticed about my team we are a great example of this city. look at the diversity of personalities, where we all come from, the different faces from different stories and we all have one goal in mine. we had one job in mine. we had one dream in mine and that is to be world series champions with this group and i am proud to say that. you guys the same thing. we couldn't have done it without you, the city of san francisco. like i said you guys better be proud. you need to be proud and i will tell you for dang sure we are all world series champions and wearing orange and black in san francisco. [cheers and applause] >> all right. now i would like to introduce two more gentlemen. the firs
to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again shad dei thank you very much for your work. to all of you here tonight from the city family i want to saw thank you for joining us here as well and to really encourage you to take part of in all of the if he istivities that we have to offer here at city hall and for those of you who have an opportunity to tine sign in at the front please do so we can reach you through the mayor's office and neighborhood services center which highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san francisco and in our city. and so while we take a pause, for a moment, to bring some more art into our hall, we would like to pause for one more musical enter lewd and to begin with the rest of our program. so thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ (applause). . (applause). . . >> thank you guys so much for that beautiful performance can w
other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the different sectors. for those of you familiar with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san fr
how much energy and funds were being focused on the northern waterfront and requested whether or not we could do more in the southern waterfront and i think these projects are an example of how we responded to that challenge, so monique moyer executive director. [applause] >> good morning and thank you. it is wonderful to see so many of our friends and supporters and hard workers here today. how many of you are here at heron's head for the first time? a show of hands. not many. that is terrific news. well welcome back. this is one of the greatest places in the city i am fond of saying. it's visionary. you heard about that from the mayor already and part of it is san francisco moving forward in a way that other cities just don't do. first and foremost other cities do not pass general obligation bonds of this type for a park and none for waterfront parks so we are already ahead of game that way, and we are proud of the generosity of the electoral for supporting that vision. secondly we don't have many parks and in san francisco there are a couple of open spaces but not in
a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get the community toget
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)